Make the Image – Red Butter Lettuce

You don’t take a photograph, you make it.

Ansel Adams

 

 

  • Before-Red Butter Lettuce
    After-Red Butter Lettuce
    BeforeRed Butter LettuceAfter

 

Here is a simple image – fresh red butter lettuce in a stainless steel colander.  The straight out of camera (SOOC) image is not bad but, like most SOOC images, it can be better.  In this particular image, for example, I find the reflection of the table in the colander to be distracting.  Using the gradient tool in Lightroom, I was able to remove it by simply lowering the saturation.  Check out the video below for my full post-processing workflow on this image.  

 

 

Food Photography: How to Ripen Tomatoes in Photoshop

Food Photography | November 25, 2016 | By

  • Before-Ripen tomatoes
    After-Ripen tomatoes
    BeforeRipen tomatoes After

 

 

Here is a simple method for increasing the saturation of a specific color in Photoshop. In this example, we’ll use it to “ripen” tomato slices on a bacon cheeseburger.

  1.  Here is the “before” image.  The tomatoes are in need of a saturation boost.

Tomatoes-1

 

2.  Add a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer.  Select the Reds (vs Master) and push the saturation slider to the right until you achieve the desired effect.

Tomatoes - 2

3.  Now select the Yellows and move the hue slider just a bit to the left.

Tomatoes - 3

4.  These changes are currently applied to the entire image, but we only want them applied to the tomatoes.  In order to hide the effect, fill the layer mask with black (command-delete on a Mac).

Tomatoes - 4

5.  Now choose a soft brush and set the foreground color to white.  With the layer mask selected, start to paint the effect back onto the tomato slices.

Tomatoes - 5

6.  Continue painting the color back into the tomatoes, being careful not to stray into other areas of the burger.

tomatoes - 6

7.  Finally, adjust the opacity of the Hue/Saturation layer to a level that suits your taste.

Tomatoes - 7

 

Prefer video?  Here you go!

 

Guest Post and $100 Fracture Gift Card Code Giveaway!

Uncategorized | September 10, 2016 | By

I’m grateful for the opportunity to guest post on the Fracture blog.  Head over for a few tips on getting started with post-processing.  The fine folks at Fracture have also provided the code for a $100 gift card that you can win in the giveaway below!

If you haven’t tried Fracture, here is your chance to take a free test drive.  Fracture prints your photos directly to glass – it is a picture frame and mount all in one.  I’ve had some of my images printed on Fracture and have been very pleased with the results.  The prints are sharp with vibrant colors and look great on glass. 

Enter the giveaway below for a chance to win the gift card.  Don’t have a favorite image to print?  I’ll throw in one of mine – you can select any image from my 500px portfolio and I’ll send you a link to download that image for your personal use.

1 winner will be randomly selected from a maximum of 50 entrants.  Good luck!!

 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Cropping to Improve Your Images

In The Lab | August 6, 2016 | By

A simple crop can often dramatically improve your images.  Here is a quick tutorial on cropping in Lightroom:

Got Fringe? Try Inner Glow

In The Lab, Post-processing | April 3, 2016 | By

Compositing in Photoshop often requires creating delicate cutouts and placing them on new backgrounds.  Even the most careful selections have a bit of fringing that must be removed to allow for seamless blending with the background.  In this video, I show you how use a simple inner glow layer style to remove fringing.